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Holker Hall



OS grid ref:- SD 355775

Holker Hall stands in sheltered situation near Morecambe Bay. Created by the Dukes of Devonshire, it has been owned by the Cavendish family since the seventeenth century.

Holker Hall

The name Holker derives from the Old Norse language and translates as 'a rising in marshy land'. The hall itself dates to the sixteenth century, and contains fine wood carvings, furniture and paintings. A Victorian wing, added in 1874, is now open to the public. Its most interesting features are the cantilevered staircase and the magnificent library, which holds over three thousand leather bound books.



Holker Hall

Holker Hall

The courtyard cafe boasts a local menu and the Holker Food Hall offers tempting treats for sale, the gift shop has many hand selected items for sale.

Holker Hall

Holker Hall is renowned for it's truly spectacular gardens, which have recieved the accolade of world class from the Good Gardens Guide. They contain a variety of water features and are at their best in April and May, with a glorious display of azaleas and rhododendrons. Rare and exotic plants are also a feature. In all there are twenty three acres of formal and woodland gardens for the visitor to explore.

The gardens



The pleasure grounds are set in a large and verdant parkland bordered by the Lakeland fells and are home to a herd of fallow deer. The 200-acre parkland is enhanced by the late 18th century planting of Lord George Cavendish. The Great Holker Lime, with a girth of 7.9 metres, is considered to be one of the finest trees in Britain, its trunk stands in a cavern formed by overhanging branches. The Holker Lime was probably planted as part of a formal garden in the early 17th century.

The Estate

Holker Hall Grounds

Gardens of Cumbria

Castles and Stately Homes of Cumbria


Interior photograph copyright Ben Barden