Logo
Home
Windermere East
Windermere West
Southern Verges
Cumbrian
Peninsulas

Langdale Area
Coniston Region
Wordsworth Country
Western Lakes
West Coast
Thirlmere Area
Derwentwater Area
Ullswater Area
Penrith region
North Cumbria
East Cumbria

Map & satellite
Wallpapers


West Coast

Allonby
Bowness-on-Solway
Burgh-by-Sands
Calder Abbey
Coast to Coast Walk
Cumbria Coastal
Way

Egremont
Egremont Castle
Gosforth
Haverigg
Hodbarrow Point
Reserve

Maryport
Millom
Muncaster Castle
Ravenglass
Roman Bath House
Ravenglass and
Eskdale Railway

St. Bees
St. Bees Head
St. Bees Priory
Silecroft
Silloth
Swinside Stone Circle
Whitehaven

Services

Contact
Links

Swinside Stone Circle



OS Grid ref:-SD 172 882


Swinside Stone CircleSwinside Stone Circle, which dates from the Bronze Age, is one of the most impressive stone circles in the Lake District or Cumbria and is considered to be amongst the finest in Europe.

The circle stands in a superb setting amongst a mountain backdrop on artificially raised ground five miles north of the town of Millom. Fifty-five stones now remain of the original sixty, of which thirty-two still remain standing.

Swinside is sometimes referred to as Sunkenkirk, its alternative name derives from a local legend that the Devil caused the stones, which were intended for building a church, to sink at night into the ground The very well preserved circle is 93 feet eight inches (28.5 m) in diameter. The tallest stone is a high pillar located at the northernmost point of the circle. It measures 7 feet 6 inches high.

Swinside Stone Circle There is a recognisable entrance 2.1metres (7 feet) at the south east of the circle which consists of of a wide gap flanked by two portal stones just outside the perimeter. The entrance gap measures 2.1 metres. A similar entrance can be seen at the Long Meg and her Daughters Stone Circle at Little Salkeld.

There is midwinter sunrise marker looking from the centre of the circle at the two southernmost portal stones. Archaeological excavations at the beginning of the twentieth century revealed that the stones are bedded in a layer of packed pebbles.

Access to the circle is via a farm track from a minor road off the A595. The walk from the parking area, which is located on the eastern side of Black Combe, is about half a mile. The circle stands on private ground, but can be easily viewed from a nearby public footpath. Nearby Raven Crag provides some very good high views.


Prehistoric Sites in the Lake district

Images courtesy of Visit Cumbria